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CBD Daily News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • Plant breeding: 10,000 years of biodiversity threats?
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    For years, NGOs and politicians opposing modern breeding methods such as gene transfer or genome editing have claimed that these "manipulations" would pose serious health risks, from allergies to cancer or autism. However, after more than two decades of consuming transgenic crops, there is not a single confirmed case of adverse health effects caused by precision-bred plants.
  • Nature is no longer "a nice to have," it's "a must-have": Q&A with André Hoffmann
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Even before the COVID-19 pandemic went global just over a year ago, there had been a notable shift in messaging from some of the world's largest companies around their responsibility beyond profit maximization. A growing number of firms were making commitments to reduce emissions, diversify their leadership, and eliminate environmental degradation and human rights abuses from their supply chains.
  • Study reveals the complexity of microplastic pollution
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Microplastics-small plastic pieces less than 5 millimeters in length-are ubiquitous in the environment, and they can have significant effects on wildlife. A new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that there are multiple impacts of different microplastics-with varying sizes, shapes, and chemical makeup-to the survival, growth, and development of larval fathead minnows, an important prey species in lakes and rivers in North America.
  • Lower UK air pollution limits to prevent deaths, says coroner
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Legally binding maximum levels of particulate air pollution should be lowered in the UK to be in line with World Health Organization limits, a coroner has said. UK levels for two particularly harmful kinds of pollution are currently twice as high as the WHO recommends.
  • Four in 10 Americans live in counties with unhealthy air pollution levels
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    New research from the American Lung Association find that more than four in 10 people - a whopping 135 million in the US - live in counties with unhealthy levels of particle or ozone pollution.
  • Plantwatch: the trees that feed on metal
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A magnificent tall tree called Pycnandra acuminata grows on the island of New Caledonia in the South Pacific, and it does something strange - when its bark is cut it bleeds a bright blue-green latex that contains up to 25% nickel, a metal highly poisonous to most plants in more than tiny amounts.
  • Cameroon's Mangrove Forests Are Choking on Plastics
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Large amounts of plastic-bottles, cups, bags, plates, and other debris of various shapes and colors-washed up on the nearby boat ramp as we sat down to breakfast at a waterfront restaurant on our first morning in Youpwe, a neighborhood on the Wouri Estuary in Douala, Cameroon.
  • Explore nature and help Cape Town win the City Nature Challenge - here's how
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The City of Cape Town will open several of its nature reserves to the public and has arranged free guided walks between April 30 and May 3. Residents have been urged to get out and explore nature to capture as many wild plants and animals as possible and help the city win this year's City Nature Challenge. It will be competing with various other cities on the continent and globally to capture and record different species.
  • Costa Rica's Environmental Commitment Awarded by Unesco
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Costa Rica's Ministry of Foreign Affairs informed that the United Nations Organization for Science, Education and Culture (Unesco) has awarded the city of San José the Netexplo Linking Cities 2021 Award, in the category 'Zero Carbon Objective'.
  • Helsinki invests in the protection of biodiversity
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The city's Biodiversity Action Plan will safeguard plants, species and their habitats. One of Helsinki's greatest attractions is its beautiful and diverse nature. According to the municipality, over a third of the city's area consists of forests, meadows, and parks. What is more, it is also well known that Helsinki has an incredible sea area and archipelago.
  • Climate change threatens Lebanon's cedar forests
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The Lebanese have always taken pride in their cedar tree, or Cedrus libani, which presents in the middle of their national flag. However, the current situation of the national tree is worrying as the remnants cover only 3 percent of the country, or 17 square kilometers.
  • China's Xi Jinping to attend Joe Biden's climate summit
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    China's President Xi Jinping will attend a US-led climate change summit on Thursday at the invitation of President Joe Biden, in the first meeting between the two leaders since the advent of the new US administration.
  • 101 Nobel laureates call for global fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A hundred and one Nobel laureates, including the Dalai Lama, are calling for governments around the world to sign up to a fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty to help tackle the climate crisis.
  • New EU target to cut carbon emissions by at least 55% disappoints experts
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A new EU target of a 55% reduction in carbon emissions by 2030 has been described as a "farce" by environmental groups after it was agreed in Brussels on the eve of Joe Biden's climate summit for world leaders.
  • Climate change could cause 'irreversible impacts' to lake ecosystems
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    New research shows that lake "stratification periods" - a seasonal separation of water into layers - will last longer in a warmer climate. These longer periods of stratification could have "far-reaching implications" for lake ecosystems, the paper says, and can drive toxic algal blooms, fish die-offs and increased methane emissions.
  • The finance sector links arms on climate
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A big, UN-backed umbrella group of banks, asset managers, investors and insurers launched Wednesday to boost private clean tech finance and press polluting industries that use their services to cut emissions.
  • How to talk to your kids about climate change
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    With oceans rising, forests burning and growing pollution, climate change can be a depressing topic. No wonder so many avoid talking about it with our friends, family and especially our children.
  • A whale chorus reveals how climate change may be shifting migration
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Eerie wails, explosive trumpets and ghostly moans. The sounds from the underwater recorders had a story to tell, even without a single intelligible word: the whales had stayed put.
  • World Running Out Of Time To Tackle Climate Crisis, 2021 Must Be Year Of Action: UN
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    2021 must be the year of action for protecting people against the "disastrous" effects of climate change, the United Nations said on Monday ahead of a crucial US-convened summit. Time is fast running out to tackle the climate crisis, the UN warned, with the Covid-19 pandemic having failed to put the brakes on "relentless" climate change.
  • Climate Change Comic Aiming For a Better Future
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Alert your little eco-warriors, as there is a new comic on the scene and it is taking on the biggest global challenge there is! HAPSIE is a comic strip that comes from the minds at renewable energy company, Clean Planet Energy. It is comic that is trying to inspire, educate and entertain young eco-warriors who care about the world they are inheriting.
  • Scotland's Bass Rock: world's largest colony of northern gannets - in pictures
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    For more than 20 years the centre has been enabling people to learn about Scotland's marine wildlife, habitats and seabirds
  • Durham a world top 100 university for sustainability
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    We've been ranked 87th in the world for our overall contribution to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), demonstrating our commitment to a sustainable future. The rankings also place Durham in the top 100 in nine of the individual league tables for the 17 UN SDGs, an achievement we are really proud of.
  • 26 ways to live lighter on the planet, starting now
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Human impact on our world is something we can all reduce. To mark Earth Day - and the launch of National Geographic's new initiative Planet Possible - a look at sustainability ideas that begin with the most important changemakers of all: us.
  • Environmental art initiative aims to help paint a better future for Southeast Asia
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Creativity is vital for the development of innovative solutions to conservation conundrums. The daunting challenges of restoring ecosystems, curbing biodiversity loss and halting deforestation require a continuous stream of new ideas.
  • Environment Conscious Songwriters Announce Release of "DIWYC" Song on Global Warming and Climate Change
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Concerned songwriters, singers and musicians have released a song, "DIWYC" or "Do It While You Can," in about 20 languages which will become an "Earth Day Anthem" that will remind everyone to play their role in reversing the effects of climate change
  • Earth Day 2021: Take a selfie with your kids and introduce them to climate change
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    As with any conversation around climate change, the key to long-term change is engaging people at the youngest age possible. For Earth Day 2021, Yahoo has created a virtual, whistle-stop 'world tour' of climate change to help you do just that.
  • How to teach your kids the importance of protecting our oceans
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Children are the future and we must not only take steps ourselves to protect the environment and oceans but educate our children; the future custodians of our planet. As many parents are currently enjoying the excitement, trials and tribulations of home learning, extending this learning to much-needed free time may sound exhausting, however, luckily this teaching moment needn't be boring and can be great fun for the whole family and for children of all ages.
  • Ethiopia Preparing for Third Round Massive Afforestation Campaign
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Two years ago Ethiopia has announced a vision of planting some 10 million indigenous trees in three years. This year the country has been preparing to hit the target set of planting some six billion trees.
  • How to approach the great mission of forest landscape restoration - with evidence
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR), defined as a process that aims to regain ecological functionality and enhance human wellbeing in deforested or degraded landscapes, has been promoted as a way to tackle many of the key challenges we face, including land degradation, climate change, biodiversity conservation, food security and sustainable development. However, FLR implementation still remains far below the level needed to address land degradation on a global scale.
  • Scientists develop new mapping model to save Africa's cycad plants from extinction
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Cycads, the world's oldest seed-producing plants, are facing extinction. Africa is home to a variety of cycad species and South Africa is regarded as a global hotspot for cycad diversity.
  • Dubai opens mangrove forest at Jebel Ali to protect endangered species
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The mangrove forest planted in the Jebel Ali Wildlife Sanctuary marks a decisive action towards earth restoration of a forest in the desert coastline of the UAE.
  • Forest protection: Armed with phones and seeds, jobless Kenyans tackle illegal logging
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Standing under a thick green canopy in coastal Kenya's Shim Hills, Mohamed Mwaramuno squints at his fellow forest ranger's smartphone. With about a dozen rangers, he has been using an app that through satellite feeds maps signs of forest fires, illegal logging and people encroaching on water sources, to stem worsening deforestation in Kwale County during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • New WWF analysis reveals the possibility of freeing at least 7800 km of rivers in the region from unnecessary and environmentally harmful barriers
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    WWF's new Potential of Barrier Removal to Reconnect Europe's Rivers report analyses a sample of 30,000 barriers on large and medium-sized rivers in Europe, and assesses their reconnection potential for the whole continent, the EU27, and by country. The conclusions are based on the length of river which could be reconnected, and the ecological quality of reconnected rivers which could be achieved through barrier removal.
  • Why insects are a protein-rich 'superfood'
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Insects are a nutrition-dense source of protein embraced by much of the world. Why are some of us so squeamish about eating them?
  • OPINION: Nature will help drive a better, faster COVID-19 recovery
    [released on: 20/04/2021]
    In recent decades, deforestation, biodiversity loss and pollution have destroyed the natural capital on which we rely, helping to accelerate climate change and putting us at greater risk from its impacts.
  • Webinar urges common efforts to care for biodiversity
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    VATICAN: In partnership with the Vatican Covid-19 Commission Ecology Taskforce, the Dicastery for Integral Human Development on Tuesday hosted a webinar on Biodiversity, inspired by Pope Francis' Encyclical Laudato si'.The online event, titled "The Road to COP15," aims to share wisdom, understanding, experiences and mutual insights drawn from various disciplines of knowledge including the indigenous and scientific traditions, the Holy Scriptures, and the Social Doctrine of the Church on biodiversity.
  • They identify and detail the 272 invasive species that could wreak havoc on the Iberian Peninsula
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Scientists from Spain and Portugal have identified for the first time the 272 potentially invasive species in inland waters of both countries, which will allow the implementation of early warning and eradication systems to avoid ecological and economic damage.
  • "It's deep. It's dark. It's elusive." The ocean's twilight zone is full of wonders.
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    At the beginning of the dive, you're in the ocean's epipelagic, or sunlight zone: the shallow waters where light still penetrates and photosynthetic organisms live. But as you dive deeper and deeper, the sunlight above you fades. The ocean around you gets darker and darker, colder and colder.
  • NASA NeMO-Net video game helps researchers understand global coral reef health
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Marine ecosystems are in the midst of a conservation crisis, with coral reefs in particular facing numerous challenges as a result of climate change. In an effort to better understand these environments and the threats they face, researchers collect huge image libraries of these underwater environments, using 3D imagery collected from divers and snorkelers, as well as 2D images collected from satellites.
  • 'Ocean in crisis': Global plan to protect world's seas
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A new global marine initiative has been launched to protect and conserve 18 million square kilometres of the ocean (seven million square miles) over the next five years, an area larger than the continent of South America.
  • Animal culture should be included in conservation efforts
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Researchers say conservation of some of the world's most endangered species needs to take cultural knowledge of the animals into account when working out how best to protect them.
  • Ocean warming and 'targeting big fish' affects viability of wild populations, global fish stock
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The combined effect of rapid ocean warming and the practice of targeting big fish is affecting the viability of wild populations and global fish stock says new research by the University of Melbourne and the University of Tasmania.
  • A snake crosses the Alps: The Italian barred grass snake spreads to Bavaria
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A research team from the Senckenberg Natural History Collections in Dresden and the Zoological State Collection in Munich has studied the occurrence of the Italian barred grass snake in Bavaria. Based on over 1000 samples, they show that the snake, which was only recently discovered in Germany, spread northward after the Ice Age.
  • The secret lives of farmed fish
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Aquaculture is becoming increasingly important as a source of food for our growing population. Worldwide, billions of fish are farmed and eaten every year, and humans now consume more farmed than wild caught fish.
  • The workers of yellow crazy ants can act like lazy wannabe queens, so we watched them fight
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    The invasive ant world is a competitive one, rife with territorial battles and colony raids. And yellow crazy ants (Anoplolepis gracilipes), one of the world's worst invasive species, have an especially interesting trait: they're the only invasive ant known to have workers who can reproduce.
  • Young male fruit flies make females fight each other more
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Mating changes female behavior across a wide range of animals, with these changes induced by components of the male ejaculate, such as sperm and seminal fluid proteins. However, males can vary significantly in their ejaculates, due to factors such as age, mating history, or feeding status. This male variation may therefore lead to variation in the strength of responses males can stimulate in females.
  • Charles Darwin and conspicuous consumption: Why bling is blingy
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Luxury brands are a prominent feature of modern society. Thorstein Veblen coined the term "conspicuous consumption" to describe how the upper classes showcased expensive goods without inherent practical benefits to demonstrate their economic power.
  • Great White feeding ground reveals shockingly low populations of famed shark
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Perhaps no other ocean creature lives in the human imagination like the great white shark. But while great white sharks might be plentiful in the minds of beachgoers across the country, there are only a handful of places in the world where white sharks can be consistently found.
  • Downstream consequences: How NASA satellites track harmful algal blooms
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Fertilizers used in farming contain high amounts of nutrients, such as phosphorous, to help crops grow. But these same nutrients can cause unwanted plant growth and potentially harm ecosystems miles away if agricultural runoff flows into nearby rivers, lakes, or coastal waters.
  • Does paternal health status in mosquitoes influence maternal offspring results?
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Scientists at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences are one step closer to learning the factors that ultimately lead to characteristic differences in mosquito offspring-a key takeaway in the make-up of mosquito species and a critical finding in the continued research of mosquito-borne illnesses.
  • New giant dinosaur species discovered in Chile
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Chilean paleontologists announced Monday the discovery of a new species of giant dinosaurs called Arackar licanantay. The dinosaur belongs to the titanosaur dinosaur family tree but is unique in the world due to features on its dorsal vertebrae.
  • Using engineering methods to track the imperceptible movements of stony corals
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Coral reefs around the world are under threat from rising sea temperatures, ocean acidification, disease and overfishing, among other reasons.
  • Gaps in genetic knowledge affect kiwi conservation efforts
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    Kiwi are iconic birds that have been severely impacted by deforestation and predation from invasive mammals since the arrival of humans in New Zealand. The remaining kiwi can be split into 14 clusters that are now treated as separate conservation management units. A review published in Ibis examines the latest information on kiwi genetics to investigate the legitimacy for maintaining these differences.
  • Research outlines innovative legal strategies for conserving big-game migration corridors
    [released on: 21/04/2021]
    A new interdisciplinary study led by University of Wyoming researchers brings together approaches from ecology, economics and law to explore emerging big-game migration corridor conservation strategies meant to protect the phenomenon of migration across vast and complex landscapes.