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Event 'Green Grabbing' op Symposium Poverty and Conservation

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We are pleased to invite you to the 2013 Poverty and Conservation Learning Group (PCLG) Symposium - jointly organised by IIED, the International Land Coalition (ILC), the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Maliasili Initiatives.
 
When: Tuesday 26 -Wednesday 27 March 2013
Where: London Zoo
Register:   Places are limited so please register to attend by contacting Alessandra Giuliani (alessandra.giuliani@iied.org).
 
More information:  Available on the PCLG website or by contacting Dilys Roe (dilys.roe@iied.org)

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Period [26/03/2013 - 27/03/2013]
Event location The Mappin Pavillion, London Zoo, London ZSL London Zoo, Regent's Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
Host Int. Inst. for Environment and Development and others
Event URL http://povertyandconservation.info/en/articles/conservation-and-land-grabbing-part-problem-or-part-solution
Contact person Dilys Roe
Email address: dilys.roe@iied.org
Phone: +44 (0)20 3463 1546
Theme(s) Ecosystems , Others
Target group(s) Adults
Type Meeting (seminar / conference / symposium / festival) Meeting (seminar / conference / symposium / festival)

The overall objective of the symposium is to examine the varied interactions between conservation and land rights/land grabbing in a variety of global contexts; to encourage more strategic engagement by the conservation movement in land rights and tenure concerns, highlighting different models that can be used to secure or strengthen local land rights, and the potential role of conservation in combating land grabbing thus benefitting both conservation and development.

Key themes will include:
 
1.            Key trends in land grabbing in general, and specifically ‘green grabbing’ and land acquisitions for conservation since 2000 - including variations between countries and regions. What forms do they take? What are the key drivers? Is this a new phenomenon or a continuation of a historical process? Is it escalating? Who owns the land and who is acquiring it and for what purpose?
 
2.            Conservation as a source and victim of land grabs – Conservation may be one of the drivers of land grabs - to increase protected area coverage, to exploit valuable tourism or hunting opportunities etc. At the same time, in some locations, land previously set aside for conservation is being converted to other uses – agriculture, biofuels, etc.
 
3.            Conservation strategies for securing community land rights - what models exist for securing or strengthening local land rights that could work for both conservation and local livelihoods? What are the opportunities for a) scaling these up and b) integrating them within wider efforts to address land acquisition, landscape transformations, and community land rights.

4.            Towards greater safeguards and synergies - are there underexploited opportunities for conservation interests e.g. under the CBD, and efforts to address land grabbing e.g. through the FAO Voluntary Guidelines, to better link up through shared concerns and common interventions?

Kate Wilson
Publications & Marketing Manager
International Institute for Environment and Development
80-86 Gray’s Inn Road, London, WC1x 8NH